50 Interesting & Fun Facts About Vermont State to Know

17 min read

Destguides may receive commissions from purchases made through affiliate links in this article.

Green grass with a pond, small buildings, a road, and fall trees surrounding it
There are many facts to learn about the scenic New England state of Vermont

How many interesting and fun facts about Vermont state can you list? Since it's one of the smallest areas in the US, you might not know much about it!

Vermont might be the second-smallest state by population, but it's one of the most interesting in the country. Did you know it's the only New England state that's not on the coast? It also produces so much ice cream waste that the remaining is used to help out farmers!

Whether you're a history buff or want to learn something new, Vermont has facts and trivia to interest you! Read on to discover 50 facts about Vermont state you probably didn't know.

  • 50 Vermont facts

50 Vermont State Facts

  1. Interesting Facts About Vermont
    1. It's often the first state to pass laws
    2. The state's population is low
    3. Most of the USA's marble is produced here
    4. The Connecticut River is the region's longest
    5. No city has over 50,000 residents
    6. There's a second state motto
    7. Vermont's territory belonged to other states
    8. There's a state song
    9. Rudyard Kipling lived in Vermont
    10. A Burlington man did the first cross-country road trip
    11. There aren't any skyscrapers in this state
    12. The largest astronomy lesson took place here
  2. Funny Facts About Vermont
    1. A lot of maple syrup is produced here
    2. Farmers use ice cream waste
    3. The hermit thrush is a symbol
    4. Montpelier is the smallest state capital
    5. Vermont is called the "Green Mountain State"
    6. There are a lot of sugar maple trees here
    7. The Vermont State Fair is historic
    8. Ethan Allen was a Jack of all trades
    9. It's home to the largest producer of teddy bears
    10. The state's nickname is a translation
  3. Vermont Fun Facts
    1. Red clovers grow everywhere
    2. Vermont's original motto was in English
    3. There's an international border
    4. It's part of New England
    5. Legends say a monster lives in Lake Champlain
    6. It has a lot of cows
    7. The Von Trapp family moved to Vermont
    8. Billboard advertising is banned
    9. There's only one area code
    10. President Calvin Coolidge was a Vermont native
  4. Vermont History Facts
    1. The Green Mountain Boys defended the state
    2. Vermont was the 14th state
    3. It was briefly a country
    4. The Morgan horse was bred here
    5. Lake Champlain has the oldest fossil reef
    6. French explorer Samuel de Champlain explored this state
    7. The first postage stamp was made here
    8. A Vermont native was elected to Congress
  5. Cool Facts About Vermont
    1. The first thru-hiking trail opened here
    2. It's the safest state
    3. The state's flag is symbolic
    4. The honeybee is important
    5. It might be the happiest state
    6. A lot of Olympic athletes are from Vermont
    7. It's home to the largest granite quarry
  6. Weird Facts About Vermont
    1. There's no access to the Atlantic
    2. Lake Champlain was part of the great lakes
    3. Vermont has the most bridges per square mile

Show all

Interesting Facts About Vermont

A lake next to waterfalls, autumn trees, and small brick houses under a blue sky
Vergennes is the smallest city in Vermont, with a population of under 3,000

It's often the first state to pass laws

Though Vermont is one of the smallest states in the country, it's often considered one of the most progressive when it comes to passing laws. This reputation dates back even before its statehood.

In 1777, Vermont became the first colony in North America to abolish slavery. More recently, it was one of the first states to pass marriage equality laws.

The state's population is low

Not only does Vermont have the smallest state capital, but it's the second smallest state by population in the entire country. As of 2020, there were only 643,503 full-time residents in the state.

Though the state still lacks transportation and metropolitan infrastructure that typically draws new residents, the state's population is growing steadily.

Most of the USA's marble is produced here

Since the early 1900s, Vermont has been a major marble producer in the country. However, the state's marble quarries are much older.

The oldest quarry in Vermont was opened in the 1600s and has been in continuous operation ever since. Multiple types of marble are found in the state, but the most famous is the verde antique marble, which is dark green.

A river with grass and green and orange trees surrounding it
The Connecticut River runs through Vermont and is New England's longest river

The Connecticut River is the region's longest

The Connecticut River is the longest in New England. Its path is over 250 miles long and cuts through four other states.

The river also forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont. While the river is subject to annual flooding, Vermont's section is typically a low-water region with minimal risks.

A red brick street lined with small buildings and trees, and a chapel in the middle
Burlington is Vermont's most populated city, yet no city has over 50,000 residents

No city has over 50,000 residents

With only around 650,000 residents, it's not a surprise that Vermont doesn't have any large cities. However, you might not know that the state doesn't have any cities with over 100,000 residents.

The largest city in Vermont is Burlington, with 45,000 citizens. Its smallest city is Vergennes, with just over 2,500 residents.

There's a second state motto

One of the most interesting facts about Vermont is that there's a new official state motto. In 2015, "Stella quarta decima fulgeat" became the state's Latin motto.

The phrase means "the fourteenth star." This references Vermont's history as the 14th state to earn a star on the American flag.

Vermont's territory belonged to other states

Before it was an autonomous territory, Vermont's land belonged to other colonies. Both New York and New Hampshire have claimed the Vermont area as their own at some point.

The land was part of a lengthy dispute between the New York and New Hampshire colonies that lasted between 1749 and 1764. In 1777, Vermont declared itself as an independent territory.

There's a state song

If you're in Vermont during any special events, you might hear the official state song. "These Green Mountains" by Diane Martin and Rita Buglass Gluck became a state symbol in 2000.

This song replaced the original state song, "Hail to Vermont." The search for a new song began in 1998 and over 100 possibilities were considered before one was chosen.

Rudyard Kipling lived in Vermont

Rudyard Kipling was an English novelist who wrote childhood classics like "The Jungle Book." He's renowned, though, for his stories describing the lives of English men and women in India. He eventually moved to the US and settled in Vermont.

His home was named "Naulakha". It was built in 1893 and was the writer's residence until 1896. Since 1993, the property has been listed as a National Historic Landmark.

A Burlington man did the first cross-country road trip

Horatio Nelson Jackson was a doctor from Burlington, Vermont. In 1903, he made the historic decision to drive across the United States.

Though he was from New England, he started his journey in California and ended it in New York. The journey took 63 days. He inspired Alice Ramsey, who became the first woman to drive across the country in 1909.

There aren't any skyscrapers in this state

Though initially the term "skyscraper" referred to buildings that were 10-20 stories, or floors, that definition has changed. Now, to be considered a skyscraper, a building has to be over 40 stories.

If you follow the original definition, Vermont has multiple skyscrapers. However, since the tallest building in the state, Decker Towers, only has 11 floors, there are no "modern" skyscrapers.

The largest astronomy lesson took place here

On August 10, 2018, a world record was broken in St. Johnsbury, Vermont. 1580 people gathered to participate in the largest astronomy lesson in history.

The event, which was authenticated by the Guinness World Records Association, was meant to help support the Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium. The previous record-holder had 536 attendees.

Funny Facts About Vermont

A view of Montpelier, Vermont, with white and red buildings, a chapel, and fall trees
Montpelier is the smallest state capital in the United States
James Kirkikis/Shutterstock.com
A country store with maple products on a shelf and a "Vermont Maple Syrup" sign
Vermont is the US' largest maple syrup producer, making a million gallons a year

A lot of maple syrup is produced here

Maple syrup is often associated with Canada, but over half of the USA's maple syrup market comes from Vermont. It's such a lucrative part of the state's economy that there are specific regulations regarding maple products.

There are over 3000 syrup producers in Vermont. Typically, around 1.5 million gallons of the stuff is made every year. However, 2020 broke that record by producing over 2 million.

ElectricEgg/Depositphotos.com
A building with an ice cream cone sign that says "Ben & Jerry's"
The Ben & Jerry's Vermont factory provides "ice cream waste" to local farmers

Farmers use ice cream waste

Ben & Jerry's is one of the most popular ice cream companies in America. Its main factory and company headquarters are found in Vermont. The factory produces hundreds of gallons of "ice cream waste" daily, which is usually water contaminated by the different flavors.

Amazingly, this sugary water has been used as renewable energy to power homes and farms. The more substantial ice cream waste is also regularly given to Vermont pig farmers, who mix it in their animals' food. The pigs must have fun eating that.

A hermit thrush on a tree stump with tree branches around it
Hermit thrushes can be found throughout Vermont, even in colder months

The hermit thrush is a symbol

The Vermont state bird was chosen due to its interesting migration habits. It's been noted that some hermit thrush birds choose to leave Vermont when it gets colder. However, others have been spotted in Vermont well into the winter.

This little six-inch bird prefers to stay in forest areas during the winter and spring seasons. But if you look closely, you may spot them all over the state.

A state capitol building with a gold dome roof next to trees and a garden
The state capital of Montpelier is the smallest in the US, with a population of 8,000

Montpelier is the smallest state capital

An interesting fact about Vermont state is that Montpelier might be Vermont's state capital, but it's far from its largest city. With only 8000 residents, it's the smallest state capital in the country by population. The people of Vermont have always stuck with this charming town as their capital.

Vermont is called the "Green Mountain State"

The Vermont state nickname is the "Green Mountain State". That's the moniker you'll find on the state's license plates and in tourist brochures.

This nickname has been part of Vermont culture since the Revolutionary War. The state's most famous militia even adopted the name as their own. They were called the "Green Mountain Boys."

Stock for you/Shutterstock.com
An autumn view of the lovely sugar maple
Facts about Vermont state include that it's home to the sugar maple, its state tree

There are a lot of sugar maple trees here

A lot of state of Vermont facts center around the state's booming syrup industry. It's become such an important product that the sugar maple was named the official Vermont state tree.

The decision was made in 1949 due to the popularity of the state's maple syrup and the abundance of these trees in the area. 20% of the trees in the state, particularly those in Vermont forests, are sugar maples.

The Vermont State Fair is historic

As one of the oldest territories in the country, the Vermont State Fair is also one of the USA's oldest. The first fair was held in 1853.

Though there are multiple fairs held in the state every year, the state fair is still the largest and most popular. An estimated 50 thousand people attend every year, and this number continues to grow.

Ethan Allen was a Jack of all trades

Ethan Allen was a most important figure in shaping Vermont's history. He worked on making Vermont a separate state from New York.

Allen is perhaps most well-known as a soldier in the Revolutionary War, as he led the state's Green Mountain Boys militia. However, he was also a frontiersman, philosopher, writer, and politician.

Alexander Sviridov/Shutterstock.com
A board with teddy bear shapes that says "Vermont Teddy Bear" and colorful buildings
The Vermont Teddy Bear Factory is one of the largest teddy bear producers in the US

It's home to the largest producer of teddy bears

The Vermont Teddy Bear Factory is one of the state's most popular landmarks. Though it's only been in operation since the 1980s, it's become one of the country's largest teddy bear producers.

The company has always strived for innovation. They initially gained popularity with their "bear-grams," which were hand-crafted, stuffed animals that were ordered and sent by mail.

The state's nickname is a translation

If you were wondering why so many historical facts about Vermont have to do with green mountains, keep reading. The state's nickname is a literal translation of its official name.

Vermont is made up of two French words. "Ver" comes from "vert," which means green, and "Mont," meaning mountain. This name was given to the area by the first French explorers in the area and it clearly stuck.

Vermont Fun Facts

A green field with cows grazing next to small barns and autumn trees
With 260,000 cows in Vermont, there's around one cow for every three residents
Red clover flowers growing everywhere - one of the facts about Vermont state
In Vermont's spring and summer, you can see fields full of red clovers

Red clovers grow everywhere

If you visit the area during the spring or summer, you'll likely see the Vermont state flower. The red clover is a reddish-purple flower that grows all over Vermont as well as in other states in the country.

Due to their abundance, people have started studying the potential health benefits of red clovers. Results up until now have been inconclusive, but more research is being conducted.

Vermont's original motto was in English

"Freedom and Unity" was the official Vermont state motto starting in 1788. It was used on Vermont's seal when it was still considered a republic.

The motto is meant to mean that two seemingly opposite ideas can balance each other. It encompasses the ideal of being part of a community while still having personal freedom.

There's an international border

Most states in the US are only bordered by other states. While Vermont does share a state line with New York, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts, it also has an international border.

You can enter Canada from Vermont. There are multiple ports of entry into the US from Canada and the state regularly does business across the border.

It's part of New England

Vermont is part of the USA's northeast region that's often called "New England." New England is formed by Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

This area was settled by Puritans who came from England. Though they came to the new world to exercise more freedoms, they remained loyal to their British roots. They named many of their settlements after places in England.

A lake with sailboats and a lighthouse in the distance under a blue sky with clouds
Many Vermont residents believe a monster lives in Lake Champlain

Legends say a monster lives in Lake Champlain

Vermont's Lake Champlain has an urban legend that rivals the Loch Ness Monster. Residents in the area claim a monster lives under the lake's surfaces.

The monster has affectionately been dubbed "Champ" by the locals. Throughout history, there have been 300 sightings of Champ, some of which date back to the 1600s. Unfortunately, no one has been able to definitively confirm its existence.

Stock for you/Shutterstock.com
Black and white cows grazing in a field with autumn trees behind them
Vermont is home to many cows and has the highest ratio of cows to people in the US

It has a lot of cows

One of the most common Vermont jokes is that there are more cows in the state than there are people. While that's not true, it does have the highest ratio of cows to people in the country.

There are an estimated 260,000 cows in the state located on nearly 1000 farms. If you compare that number to the state's population, there's about one cow for every three residents.

A black wooden ski lodge with an Austrian flag and a "Trapp Family Lodge" sign
While in Vermont, you can stay at a lodge previously owned by the Von Trapp family

The Von Trapp family moved to Vermont

Vermont facts and information also have some cinematic roots. Fans of "The Sound of Music" probably know that there was a real Von Trapp family.

In the 1940s, the Austrian family visited the United States in search of a new home. They eventually fell in love with Vermont and settled there. Their family home was eventually turned into a ski lodge and is now a top thing to do in Stowe, Vermont.

Billboard advertising is banned

Though billboards are a staple in most of the US, a few states have banned this type of advertising. Vermont is among those that have passed laws prohibiting billboards.

This law was passed in 1968. Those who had already erected roadside ads had been given five years' grace to remove them in due course. The law is meant to reduce visual clutter and make driving safer.

There's only one area code

If you live in a large state, either by size or by population, there are likely different area codes that precede phone numbers. These codes speed up the process of routing phone calls to the right telephone.

Vermont is one of 12 states that has only one area code. There are at least 11 other states that follow this example.

A blue sign on the grass that says "President Calvin Coolidge State Historic Site"
Calvin Coolidge was born in Plymouth, VT, which features a dedicated historic site

President Calvin Coolidge was a Vermont native

Calvin Coolidge was the 30th President of the United States. Before becoming the country's leader, he was a Vermont native.

He was born in Plymouth on July 4th, 1872. He is the only US president to be born on Independence Day. President Chester Arthur was also from Vermont.

Vermont History Facts

A small white lighthouse on a lake with hills in the distance
Chazy Fossil Reef, the world's oldest fossil reef, is found in Lake Champlain

The Green Mountain Boys defended the state

You've already read a little about the Green Mountain Boys. Formed in 1770, this militia group defended the area that was originally called the New Hampshire Grants. The area was later renamed the Vermont Republic.

Led by Ethan Allen, these men were the main line of defense for the region during the Revolutionary War. As they were an unauthorized militia, they were entirely self-organized and independent.

Vermont was the 14th state

Vermont was the 14th state in the USA. In 1791, it was officially integrated into the United States.

The vote happened a few months after the Vermont government petitioned for statehood. Vermont was the first state to join the united states after the original 13 colonies.

It was briefly a country

You can't learn Vermont facts and history without hearing that Vermont was a country. After declaring independence from New York and New Hampshire in 1777, the Vermont Republic was formed.

This country only lasted until 1791, when it petitioned for statehood. However, during its time, the country had its own postal system, government, military, and currency.

The black Morgan horse trotting in a grass field with green trees behind it
The Morgan horse is the Vermont state animal and one of the first US-bred horses

The Morgan horse was bred here

The Vermont state animal is a historic breed in the country. The Morgan horse was one of the first horses to be bred only in the US.

A statue of the first Morgan horse, named "Figure", was recently erected in Weybridge, Vermont. This statue not only honored the breed's history but is a tribute to its contribution to farmers and agriculture.

A lake with a speed boat on it with green trees and a mountain behind it
The world's oldest fossil reef sits below Lake Champlain

Lake Champlain has the oldest fossil reef

Lake Champlain isn't just home to a legendary monster, it's also the location of the oldest fossil reef in the world.

Chazy Fossil Reef spans multiple islands in Lake Champlain and is so massive it borders both New York and Vermont. The reef shows the flora and fauna that was once native to the area during the Paleozoic era and later.

French explorer Samuel de Champlain explored this state

Vermont was settled by British puritans, but they weren't the first Europeans in the area. Samuel de Champlain was a French explorer who explored the Atlantic coast, the Great Lakes, and parts of Canada.

Lake Champlain was named after him as he discovered it. He's also credited with giving the area its "green mountain" reputation, but not for officially naming the territory.

The first postage stamp was made here

Thomas Chubbuck was an engraver who created one of the first postage stamps while in Brattleboro, Vermont in 1864. This stamp was appropriately dubbed the "Brattleboro stamp."

Many stamp collectors say that it was the first postage stamp ever printed. However, that claim is contested. There may have been stamps already in use in New York.

A Vermont native was elected to Congress

Alexander Twilight made history as the first African American to serve in Congress. He was a Vermont native who was elected in 1836.

As the first state to abolish slavery, Twilight was able to gain momentum in politics in pre-Civil War America. He was also one of the first African American men to graduate from college in the US.

Cool Facts About Vermont

A snowy mountain with alpine trees and people skiing on it
Vermont has many ski resorts and has sent numerous athletes to the Winter Olympics
A lake with rocks near the shore surrounded by green trees under a blue sky
The Vermont Long Trail has beautiful scenery and is the US' oldest thru-hiking trail

The first thru-hiking trail opened here

Lists of facts about Vermont often don't mention that it's a historic place for hiking. While many think of the Appalachian Trail or the Pacific Crest Trail when they think of distance trekking, those aren't the oldest.

The oldest thru-hiking trail in the country is Vermont's Long Trail. It was completed in 1930 and spans 272 miles, which is short in comparison to longer hikes. However, it was the first of its kind.

It's the safest state

Assessing a state's level of safety isn't simple. There are a lot of factors to be considered like weather, pollution, and crime rates.

According to studies, Vermont is routinely ranked as one of the safest states in the country. This is mostly due to the low rate of violent crime reported there.

A building with the blue Vermont state flag that has an emblem with a tree on it
The current Vermont state flag was designed in 1923

The state's flag is symbolic

The Vermont state flag has changed throughout the state's history. The initial design was used by the Green Mountain Boys as their militia emblem. It featured stars and stripes similar to the US flag.

In 1923, the modern-day design was approved. It features cows to represent the state's dairy industry, as well as its original motto and the state coat of arms.

The honeybee is important

In 1977, Vermont passed legislation that named the honeybee the official state insect. The decision was made by the state's general assembly.

The honeybee is native to the state, but that's not the only reason it was chosen. Since bees live and work together in a hive, they're symbolic of the "unity" in Vermont's original motto.

It might be the happiest state

According to research, Vermont isn't just a safe state, it's also a happy one. Vermont's residents routinely report they have higher happiness levels when compared with the levels in other parts of the country.

The reasons for this are unknown, but there are a few theories. It seems that easily accessible healthcare and education play a role in Vermonters' happiness.

A snowy mountain with snow-covered trees, a red lodge, and people skiing
Vermont is a famous snow sports destination and has produced many Olympic athletes

A lot of Olympic athletes are from Vermont

Vermont might be a small state, but it's been home to some of America's greatest winter-specialist athletes. In the 2022 Olympics alone, 24 Vermont athletes represented the country, including a few medalists.

Since the state gets up to 25 feet of snow per year, many winter athletes choose to train there. The number of Vermont natives who have competed in the Summer Olympics is much lower.

It's home to the largest granite quarry

Vermont is rich in natural minerals. Not only does it have abundant marble quarries, but it also has the largest deep-hole granite quarry in the world.

The Smith Quarry is nearly 600 feet deep, most of which is underwater. The quarry has been in operation since the 1880s. Today, tours are popular with visitors.

Weird Facts About Vermont

A wood-covered bridge next to a tree with pink flowers, a house, and a white fence
Vermont features many beautiful covered bridges, with some dating from the 1800s

There's no access to the Atlantic

Vermont may be in the eastern part of the US, but it's a landlocked state. It's also the smallest landlocked territory in the country.

It's the only state in New England that doesn't have direct access to the Atlantic Ocean. However, since rivers flow through the state, it does have indirect access to larger bodies of water.

Lake Champlain was part of the great lakes

The Great Lakes are a cluster of the five largest lakes in the United States. They're called Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario.

Lake Champlain was the sixth great lake for a brief time since it's the sixth-largest internal body of water in the country. In 1998 a bill was passed granting Lake Champlain this title, but it was only in effect for 18 days.

A wood-covered bridge over a road with fall trees surrounding it
Vermont has more than 100 covered bridges, like Emily's Bridge in Stowe

Vermont has the most bridges per square mile

Vermont has over 100 covered bridges within the state. These bridges were all built between 1820 and the late-1900s. They've gained popularity and are now state cultural landmarks.

Vermont's total land area is just over 9,600 square miles. When you do the math, that means there's a covered bridge around every 93-96 square miles.

In Summary

What did you think about this list? Did you have any idea that the "Green Mountain State's" nickname was a literal translation? Or that the state produces so much marble and syrup?

Vermont is among the oldest states in the country, so it's not surprising there are many interesting trivia facts about it. Hopefully, this list has inspired you to plan a visit to Vermont sometime soon!

This article was edited by Henry Grahame.

Give us feedback about this article

For more interesting articles about United States, read:

For some great articles about facts, check out:


Written by Gabrielle T

ggtraveler1213 WRITER Gabrielle loves all things travel and culture. She is originally from the USA, but she has lived in Italy for over a decade. She's always ready to pack her bags, grab her passport, and head out on an adventure!


Want to keep exploring?

Subscribe for discounts on tickets and hotels and our latest guides.

Thank you for subscribing

We will be in touch soon with discounts on tickets and hotels and our latest guides.

Want to keep exploring?

Subscribe for discounts on tickets and hotels and our latest guides.

Thank you for subscribing

We will be in touch soon with discounts on tickets and hotels and our latest guides.

Want to keep exploring?

Subscribe for discounts on tickets and hotels and our latest guides.

By entering your email address you agree to our Terms & Conditions, Privacy policy, and consent to receive emails.